Sacramento Time of Remembrance to Include Premiere of Documentary

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SACRAMENTO — The Northern California JACL Time of Remembrance Committee (Florin, Lodi, Placer County and Sacramento chapters) is presenting a community-wide program at The California Museum, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, on Saturday, Feb. 15, from 1 to 3 p.m.

relocation arkansas“Relocation, Arkansas” will have its California premiere with producer/director Vivienne Lie Schiffer present. This documentary highlights the extraordinary efforts of Rosalie Gould to save the artwork of students incarcerated at the Rohwer internment camp during World War II. A former mayor of McGhee, Ark., she became a champion in advocating, educating and preserving the Rohwer site as a remembrance of this part of American history.

To see a trailer for the film, go to http://vimeo.com/35613672.

A reception will be held from 12 to 12:45 p.m. Donations will be accepted at the door. Museum admission is $20 general, $15 for students, and includes the reception and viewing of the exhibition “Uprooted: Japanese Americans During World War II.”

For more information, visit www.californiamuseum.org or www.nctor.org.

The committee is also sponsoring an eight-week, multimedia education program that started Jan. 27 and ends March 21. The Time of Remembrance Discovery Program enables students to learn about the Japanese American experience during World War II from those who lived it. This powerful program includes a walk through a re-creation of an incarceration camp barrack, a replica guard tower, and personal stories from volunteers of Japanese ancestry. Students from throughout Northern California explore concepts such as citizenship, constitutionality, and redress.

For information on the program, contact Kelly Bitz at (916) 654-1729 or [email protected]

The NCTOR and its educational partners, The California Museum, Elk Grove Unified School District, and the CSU Sacramento Library, Special Collection, plan these activities in remembrance of the signing of Executive Order 9066, which suspended due process and resulted in the unjust incarceration of approximately 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry into America’s concentration centers during World War II.

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