IMAGINE LITTLE TOKYO SHORT STORY CONTEST WINNER (JAPANESE): Ben & Akiko

0

By NAOKO OKADA

Following is the 2019 winner of the Imagine Little Tokyo Short Story Contest in the Japanese Category. The English translation is by Tiffany Tanaka. The original story in Japanese also appears below.

It’s been seven and a half years since the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The Tokyo Olympics’ huge success resulted in our Japanese American community here in Los Angeles flourishing as well. 64 years after Fred Wada’s achievements led to the 1964 Olympics being held in Tokyo, Los Angeles will host the Olympics, and the venues are almost completed.

The Terasaki Budokan opened the same year as the 2020 Olympics, and increased people’s awareness of sports even more, attracting a whole range of people. There are also an increasing number of elderly who are exercising daily, in order to achieve greater health and physical fitness through exercise.

Separate from the Olympics, various improvements for the elderly were installed in Little Tokyo, and of course, quite a few elderly people utilized the Budokan. There were facilities where the elderly could gather and spend time, and transportation connecting the facilities was established as well. It’s great that there are so many resources available for the elderly, more than ten years after the sale of Keiro Nursing Home that occurred in 2015 divided the Japanese and Japanese American communities.

The nature of retirement facilities has changed dramatically from 2018. “Elderly,” a growing demographic, was hard to define by a person’s age or physical strength. Second-generation baby boomers are in their 60s to 80s, and there was an increase in the population of people who are living long lives, or who are active members of society. This is the story of how Ben and Akiko — two lively souls — met.

Ben was born in 1945, right after World War II ended. He is a Kibei Nisei, who was a young child growing up in the aftermath of the war — experiencing hardships and poverty in Japan before returning to the United States. Akiko was born in Japan, in the latter half of 1955, and was raised there until she came to Los Angeles as an international student. She had not experienced the war, and since her parents were well off, they granted their daughter’s wish to study in the United States.

Akiko was not very fluent in English and needed to attend a language school first. Her parents found her a homestay with a Japanese American family in West Los Angeles. There were also many Japanese students at the language school, and Akiko ended up speaking Japanese at school.

A few months after Akiko arrived in L.A., Nisei Week began, and Akiko visited Little Tokyo for the first time. Parade-goers were already claiming seats off First and Second streets. The view was similar to festivals in Japan, but also felt like a time travel to the early Showa period. A candy-art store caught Akiko’s eyes as she looked for a spot to watch the parade.

A man in his thirties named Ben, with fair skin, bright green eyes, and light brown hair, bumped into Akiko. “Oops, sorry,” Ben’s gentle voice said. “Gomen nasai,” he apologized a second time, in fluent Japanese. Ben’s father was of European descent, and his mother was a Nisei. Japanese and English was spinning in Akiko’s head until she finally blurted out, “Go..gomen nasai.” Ben and Akiko’s first encounter ended with this short exchange of words.

A few months later, Ben showed up as a teacher at Akiko’s language school. Ben had completely forgotten that he had bumped into her in Little Tokyo, but Akiko was shocked to see him. She sat in class, wide-eyed with her mouth open. Ben wondered if she was okay. During the break, Akiko asked Ben in Japanese, “Do you remember me?” Ben answered firmly with a gentle voice, “You can’t use Japanese in my classroom, Akiko.”

“Gomen nasai…Sorry, sorry. Uh.. do you remember me? You bumped me in Little Tokyo. In front of candy man performance.” After several seconds, he finally said, “Oh, now I remember.”

Ben was a strict teacher, and his class was divided into the studious group and the group that just wanted to have fun. Ben was a great teacher to students who wanted to learn, and Akiko decided to start taking her studies seriously so she could attend college. She hadn’t yet realized that she was developing feelings for Ben.

After six months, Akiko was a college student, immersed in college life and pursuing cultural anthropology, and her English had improved to the point where she could do presentations. Specifically, she wanted to research histories of Sansei, and to create a database by examining the connections between each person’s Japanese ancestors and current relatives.

Just before she was set to graduate college, a friend gave Akiko a ticket to a kabuki show at the Aratani Theater. It had been a while since her last visit, but Little Tokyo was unchanged, greeting Akiko with the look of the good old days of early Showa years. Much to Akiko’s surprise, the man seated next to her was Ben. She hadn’t been in contact with him since finishing her language school program.

“Ben Sensei!” Akiko called out. “Oh, Akiko-san, it’s been a while.” he replied in Japanese. It was four years since they first met in Little Tokyo. The two reminisced about their first encounter with each other, and Akiko briefly talked about college and her research before the kabuki show started.

They finally exchanged numbers after the show, and Akiko’s feelings for Ben were revived, but since she would graduate college and return to Japan, she felt like Cinderella before the clock struck midnight. Life in the United States was painful but fruitful.

Two weeks after the kabuki show, Akiko received a letter from Ben, who wrote how he was surprised to see her again and how proud he was of her hard work. Akiko replied that she would return to Japan in a few months. In his next letter, Ben asked Akiko to come to a restaurant in Little Tokyo for her farewell party. Akiko was delighted and accepted the invitation. At the farewell party, she saw several language school classmates, including those who she went to her first Nisei Week with. Time passed, and Akiko returned to Japan.

Akiko had gone on to graduate school to continue the research she began in college. One day, a letter from Ben arrived. He was coming to Japan, and asked her to show him around. Akiko happily obliged. She felt like it was fate that would reunite the two in Tokyo instead of Little Tokyo this time.

No one knew at the time, that Akiko would return to the United States after graduate school, and work on creating organizations for the elderly, or that she would be working on the 2028 Los Angeles Olympics.

—–

Naoko Okada works for the Nibei Foundation in West Los Angeles. This story, based on her experiences when she visited L.A. for the first time in the 1980s, was her third submission to the Imagine Little Tokyo Short Story Contest. For more information on the contest, visit the Little Tokyo Historical Society’s website at www.littletokyohs.org.

-リトル東京story Ben&Akiko編-

早いもので、2020年の東京オリンピックからすでに7年半過ぎ去っていた。東京オリンピックの大成功によって、日本のみならず、日系社会も活気づいている。NHKの大河ドラマで取り上げられたフレッド和田氏の功績で、1964年に第18回のオリンピックゲームが東京で行われ、その64年後にこのロサンゼルスでオリンピックが開催されることになり、日系社会のつながりがさらに強くなったことは決して偶然ではない。

そしていよいよ2028年にはこのロサンゼルスでのオリンピック開催が決まっている。すでに各会場となる施設も完成に向かって、最後の仕上げに入っている。

2020年のオリンピックの年に、テラサキ武道館はオープンした。人々のスポーツに向ける意識の高まりはより一層強くなり、日ごろの運動不足解消の目的の人からエリートアスリートまで、幅広く利用されている。エクササイズがもたらす、健康体力増強の効果を知り、健康のために毎日少しでも運動を続けようという高齢者が増えているのも事実だ。

こんなオリンピックにちなんだ、話題ばかりではない。ずっと懸案だった高齢者のための様々な工夫がリトル東京に施され、もちろん武道館の利用客の中に高齢者の数も少なくなかった。高齢者たちが集まって、時間を過ごすことができる施設も充実して、施設間を結ぶ交通網も確立された。

2015年に日系人と日本人社会を分断したケイロウの施設売却からすでに10年以上たった今、多角的に高齢者に対する福祉活動が行われるようになったことは大変喜ばしい。

老後施設の在り方そのものが、大きく変化してきたのは2018年ごろからだ。高齢者といっても、年齢や体力だけではくくりきれなくなり、その人口も右肩上がりだ。ベビーブーマーの2世代はすでに60代から80代後半となり、今まで世界が経験したことのない、長寿社会となり、高齢でも活発に社会で活動できる人口が増加した。これはそんな元気なベンとアキ子の出会いの話である。

ベンは昭和。終戦直後に生まれて戦争こそは知らないけれど、戦後の混乱期に日本で幼児期を迎え、貧しく、物資に困窮した時代を経験後、アメリカに帰国した帰米2世である。アキ子は昭和30年代後半生まれ。日本で生まれ日本で育った。

ベンと出会ったのはこのリトル東京。アキ子は当時同級生たちがあこがれた留学生としてロサンゼルスにやってきた。戦後20年もたっていないのに、国民一丸となって働いたおかげで日本の復興は早く、国は高度成長期を迎えていた。アキ子の両親もなかなか裕福な暮らしができるようになっていたので、一人娘の希望をかなえてあげようと、心配をかかえながらもアメリカに留学することを許した。4年間、大学を卒業するまでの間という期限付きではあったが。

アキ子は、英語がそれほど達者でなく、まず語学学校に通うことになっていた。一人暮らしを心配した両親は、知り合いをたどってホームステイ先を探してくれた。ウエストロサンゼルスの日系人宅だった。アキ子は、ホームステイ先のお父さん、お母さんにとてもかわいがってもらった。英語があまり上手でないアキ子にとって、日本語が達者なアメリカの両親に出会えたのは好都合だった。語学学校も、思った以上に日本人がいて、学校でも日本語ばかり話していた。語学学校の先生は、授業中に日本語で会話をしている日本人たちのグループに閉口気味だった。語学の発達は、現地の生活になじまないと上達しにくいからだ。

アキ子がロサンゼルスに到着して数か月後、二世ウイークが始まり、アキ子も日本語学校の友達の車にのせてもらって、リトル東京にはじめてやってきた。

語学学校の友達は裕福な家庭の学生が多く、年齢は18歳から25歳ぐらいで、BMWで通学している学生もいた。その学生は医者の息子で名前は拓、日本では学校の成績も素行も悪く、体裁を気にする両親から「お願いだからアメリカにいって勉強して。お金は心配しないで。その変わり、学校卒業するまで帰ってこなくていいから」といわれて5年以上住んでいるのに、いまだに語学学校に通っているという。

アキ子は、拓と数人の日本語学校の仲間と一緒に、二世ウイークのパレードを見にやってきた。ファーストストリート、セカンドストリートの沿道にはびっしりと観客がすでに席をおさえて、始まりを待っていた。その光景は日本で見るお祭りのようで、でもまるでタイムスリップしたみたいな感覚に襲われた。街中に掲げられた看板、商店のディスプレイ、広い道の両側にあるまるで路地裏にある商店街のようにひしめき合っているお店は、まるで昭和初期を醸し出すような光景だった。アキ子は物珍しくてきょろきょろしながら、込み合った歩道を歩いて、パレードが見れるスポットを探した。ふと目にとまったのは、飴細工。日本でも見たことがなかった。いや、そういえば小学生の時、友達の家の近所のお祭りで買ってもらったことがあったなと思い出した。日本のお祭りでも、露天や屋台のお店では、普段見ないような食べ物や飲み物を売っていたのを覚えている。カルメ焼き、リンゴ飴、ラムネ。

飴細工に見入っていると、年のころ30代の男性が、ぶつかってきた。人波に押されて、立ち止まったアキ子の停止速度に合わせられなかったようだ。アキ子は大きくよろけて、飴細工師にぶつかりそうになった。

「Oops, sorry」

やさしい男性の声。この男性がベンだった。

「ごめんなさい」

二度目は日本語で流暢に伝えた。アキ子は自分が急に立ち止まったことが悪いのはわかっていたのだが、とっさにどのように反応したらよいか、頭の中に、日本語と英語がぐるぐる回って言葉にならなかった。

「ご、ごめんなさい」

やっと言葉がでてきた。ベンの見た目は、日本人かアメリカ人かちょっとわからない。というのもベンの父はヨーロッパ系の移民で、母は日系2世。日本人にしては肌の色が白く、目の色もグリーンがかった明るい色、髪も明るい茶色をしていた。アメリカに来てまもないアキ子にとって、日本語ばかりを話していた生活の中で、初めての日本人以外の若い男性との出会いだった。混雑した人込みの中で、二人の初めての出会いはそこまでだった。

そして数か月後、ベンはアキ子が通う語学学校の先生としてある朝突然にアキ子の目の前に現れた。ベンはリトル東京でぶつかったことはすっかり忘れていたが、アキ子にとっては衝撃的な再会だった。びっくり、目を丸くして口を開けて教室に座っているアキ子をみて、ベン先生は首をかしげた。心の中で

「あれ、この学生は大丈夫だろうか?日本語ばかりを使って、日本人の生活につかりすぎて、ぼけてしまっているのではないか?」

と自問した。

休み時間に意を決して、アキ子はベン先生に話しかけてみた。まずは日本語で

「ベン先生、わたしを覚えていますか?」

「You can’t use Japanese in my classroom, Akiko」

優しいけれどきっぱりと先生にいわれてしまった。

「ご、ごめんなさい。Sorry sorry. Ah, えとーdo you remember me? You bumped me in Little Tokyo. In front of candy man performance」

先生の顔には、必死になにか思い出そうとしているような、困ったような、そんな表情が数秒続いた後

「Oh, now I remember.」

二人はこうして、場所と時間を変えて運命的再会を果たした。

ベン先生の授業は厳しく、クラスはしっかり学ぶグループと、拓のようにお金があるし、楽しく滞在できればいいグループとに分かれて同じクラス内で行われた。ベン先生はしっかり語学力を身に着けて、大学の授業についていきたいグループを真剣に指導してくれた。アキ子はやっと決心して、自分が進むべき道のために、今英語力をつけて、大学に入ろうと猛烈に学習をはじめた。アキ子の心の中にひそかにベン先生を慕う気持ちがあったことは、まだ本人は気が付いていなかった。

半年がたって、アキ子は無事大学に通うようになった。そのころにはベン先生とも疎遠になって、忙しい大学生活に没頭していた。アキ子が目指したのは、文化人類学の研究だ。もっと細かくいうと、日系3世の様々なバックグラウンドを調べて、それぞれの人々と日本の先祖、現在の親戚などのつながりを調べてデータベースにしようと志した。アキ子の英語力も自信をもってプレゼンテーションできるぐらいに上達した。

大学もそろそろ卒業という時、アラタニ劇場で行われる歌舞伎のチケットを友人からもらって、観に行くことになった。アラタニ劇場では最近とてもよいプログラムが行われていると思っていたアキ子だが、住まいがウエストサイドだったので、なかなか訪問の機会が得られないでいた。久しぶりのリトル東京は、以前と変わることなく古きよき昭和の初期のような面持ちでアキ子を迎えてくれた。もらったチケットは意外といい客席で、着席して荷物をおいて一息ついた時、隣の席に座ってきた男性をみてあっと驚いた。それはなんとベン先生だった。語学学校を終了後、大学に入学してからは全然連絡も取っていなかった。まだ携帯電話もない時代で、最後の授業の際にベン先生と連絡先を交換しなかったので、連絡もとれずにいた。日本人としては、せめてお礼の手紙か、季節のお便りぐらい語学学校に送ることもできたが、送り先がわからないことを理由に先延ばしにしてきた。

アキ子が

「Ben Sensei!」

と少し上ずった声で呼びかけると、ベン先生は

「Oh、アキ子さん。久しぶり。」

とよどみのない日本語で答えた。二人が最初にリトル東京で出会ってから、なんと4年ぶりの再会だった。ベン先生は全然かわりなく、二人が飴細工師のパーフォーマンスの前でぶつかったことがまるで昨日のことのように思い出されて、アキ子はつい“ふふふ”と日本人特有の笑みをうかべた。ベン先生は“??”の顔で

「どうかしましたか?」

と尋ねた。アキ子は、ベン先生に、大学入学したこと、研究していることなどを手短に英語で伝えると、ベン先生も喜んでくれた。間もなく歌舞伎が開演、二人は会話を進めるチャンスもなく、歌舞伎に見入っていた。

2時間公演の後、お互いやっと連絡先を交換できた。かつてアキ子の心には、ほんのりとした思いがあったことがよみがえった。アキ子は、間もなく大学を卒業するので、日本に帰国しなければならない。それは両親との約束だった。12時の鐘でその姿がかわってしまうシンデレラのような気持ちでいた。アメリカでの生活は苦しかったけど、実りの多いものだったと、今更ながら自分をほめる気持ちでいっぱいだ。

歌舞伎の公演の後、2週間ほどして、ベン先生から手紙が届いた。手紙にはアキ子との再会が驚きだったこと、懐かしかったこと、そしてアキ子の努力を誉めてくれていた。アキ子は、とてもうれしかった半面、やはり日本への帰国を考え、通り一遍の返事の手紙を書いた。そして数か月後には日本に帰国することを伝えた。次に届いたベン先生の手紙は、アキ子のお別れ会をするので、リトル東京にあるレストランに来てほしいというものだった。アキ子は喜んで招待を受け、当日レストランに向かった。そこにはまだ語学学校に席をおいている拓の姿もあったし、就職したクラスメートや大学に通っているクラスメート、あの二世ウイークに一緒に行った仲間たちがいたのである。

懐かしい話に花が咲いた。アキ子にとってアメリカでの生活の第一歩を同じ学校ですごした仲間に再会できたのはうれしいことだった。そして、時は過ぎ、アキ子は日本に帰国した。

日本に帰国して、大学院に入って、アメリカの大学ではじめた研究を続けていたある日、ベン先生から手紙がとどいた。それは日本に遊びにくるというものだった。そして日本を案内してほしいと。アキ子は喜んで案内役を引き受けた。二人の再会が今度はリトル東京でなく、日本の東京でとなったのは偶然ではないような、何か運命を感じたアキ子だった。アキ子の淡い思いも、アメリカでの経験も、体験も、すべてアキ子の人生の大きな糧となっていったことは間違いない。大学院を卒業したアキ子が、再び米国の地を踏み、高齢者の組織づくりや2028年のLAオリンピックにも尽力するようになったことは、まだ誰も知らない。

Tags

Share.

Leave A Reply