Trump Impeached Over Capitol Riot

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Asian Pacific American legislators vote along party lines.

Reps. Mark Takano, Judy Chu and Kai Kahele made statements as the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump on Wednesday.

Rafu Staff and Wire Reports

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump was impeached Wednesday for an unprecedented second time, facing blame for inciting insurrection over his election loss that led to the deadly riot in the Capitol last week.

The impeachment article was passed by a vote of 232-197, with 10 Republicans joining the Democrats in the House. Freshmen Reps. Michelle Steel (R-Huntington Beach) and Young Kim (R-Diamond Bar) voted against impeachment.

In an earlier statement, Kim said she favored censure over impeachment:

“The election is over. I announced my intention to certify the electoral votes before these events with the hope that we can move forward, deescalate our rhetoric, and work together to heal our wounds. This violence and division must stop. However, I believe impeaching the president at this time will fail to hold him accountable or allow us to move forward once President-elect Biden is sworn in. This process will only create more fissures in our country as we emerge from some of our darkest days.”

Rep. Judy Chu (D-Pasadena), chair of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, stated that all its members had voted for impeachment. In addition, three CAPAC members – Reps. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance), Jamie Raskin (D-Md.), and Eric Swalwell (D-Alameda) – were appointed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi to serve as managers for the impeachment trial of Trump that will take place in the Senate.

“Last week, I hid in an office for hours, terrified to open the door because I did not know if a rioter was on the other side, ready to attack, kidnap or murder me. But my experiences and that of so many of my colleagues were just the tip of the iceberg. The U.S. Capitol was targeted, besieged, and ransacked on Jan. 6 by a murderous mob holding a noose for Vice President Pence and targeting Speaker Pelosi.  Their rampage resulted in offices and equipment destroyed, windows smashed and five people dead,” Chu said.

“We were attacked by terrorists. But this time, the terrorists were radicalized right here in the United States. Worse, they were radicalized by the president, who intentionally lied to his supporters that the election was stolen, and then told them when to come to D.C., where to protest, and who to direct their anger at. The need to remove this president could not be more urgent. He is too dangerous to remain in office.”

Rep. Kai Kahele (D-Hawaii), the second Native Hawaiian to serve in Congress, gave his first speech in the Capitol in casting his vote for impeachment.

“Our sacred oaths are hollow without accountability,” he said. “We must hold this president accountable, remove him from office, ensure he can never hold public office again. I urge my colleagues to vote the same. This oath has to matter.”

Many Republicans said the Democrats were rushing to impeach the president, a process that would normally take months, and argued that it will only fan the flames of unrest in a deeply divided country.

Trump has refused to accept any blame over his role in the attack. Five people died in the riot, including a police officer and a fervent Trump supporter who was fatally shot by police inside the Capitol as protesters were forcing their way toward an area where Congress members were sheltering in place.

As the impeachment vote was taking place, Trump released a statement about reports of further protests that the FBI and the Justice Department warned Tuesday could involve further violence.

“In light of reports of more demonstrations, I urge that there must be NO violence, NO lawbreaking and NO vandalism of any kind,” his statement said. “That is not what I stand for, and it is not what America stands for. I call on ALL Americans to help ease tensions and calm tempers. Thank you.”

Rep. Mark Takano (D-Riverside) urged the Senate to reconvene, begin a trial, and ultimately convict the president.

“He should not hold the most powerful office in the world for one more minute, and he should be barred from public office forever. He is toxic to our democracy, and only we, the Congress, can prevent him from doing future damage. It would be irresponsible for those of us who can do something to do nothing,” Takano said.

Trump is the third president in U.S. history to be impeached after Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton in 1998. Neither of the two was removed from office, as the Senate acquitted them.

Richard Nixon, facing likely impeachment for his role in covering up the Watergate scandal, resigned in 1974 before the House could vote on the articles of impeachment against him.

Voted Yes 

Ami Bera (D-Sacramento)

Judy Chu (D-Pasadena)

Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.)

Kaiali’i Kahele (D-Hawaii)

Ro Khanna (D-Santa Clara)

Andy Kim (D-N.J.)

Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-Ill.)

Ted Lieu (D-Torrance)

Doris Matsui (D-Sacramento)

Grace Meng (D-N.Y.)

Stephanie Murphy (D-Fla.)

Bobby Scott (D-Va.)

Marilyn Strickland (D-Wash.)

Mark Takano (D-Riverside)

Voted No

Young Kim (R-Diamond Bar)

Michelle Steel (R-Huntington Beach)

Statement by Rep. Young Kim

“The violence we saw last week was disgusting. Our law enforcement was attacked, lives were lost and more were put in danger. These rioters must be held accountable. Words have consequences and I believe the president should also be held accountable.

“The election is over. I announced my intention to certify the electoral votes before these events with the hope that we can move forward, deescalate our rhetoric, and work together to heal our wounds. This violence and division must stop.

“However, I believe impeaching the president at this time will fail to hold him accountable or allow us to move forward once President-elect Biden is sworn in. This process will only create more fissures in our country as we emerge from some of our darkest days.

“I believe censuring the president is a better option. This would be a strong rebuke of his actions and rhetoric and unite our country and chamber, rather than divide it. That is why yesterday I joined several of my colleagues in introducing a strong resolution censuring the president for his actions on Jan. 6.

“Words matter. Both of our parties must set better examples for our constituents, the nation, and the world. We must condemn violence in all forms and be able to peacefully debate issues and have disagreements without being disagreeable or making personal attacks on one another. As Americans, we are better than this violence and must move forward.

“The first Koreans came to the United States on this day in 1903 in search of a better life, and now 118 years later I am one of the first Korean American women to serve in Congress. I know we are the land of opportunity that welcomed me and my family into its fabric and allowed me to realize my American dream by receiving an education, starting a business, raising a family and now giving back to the community I call home as a member of the House of Representatives.

“This is the America we all know and love. I will do my part and look forward to working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle for the betterment of America and the people of California’s 39th Congressional District.”

Statement by Rep. Judy Chu

“Last week, I hid in an office for hours, terrified to open the door because I did not know if a rioter was on the other side, ready to attack, kidnap or murder me. But my experiences and that of so many of my colleagues were just the tip of the iceberg. The U.S. Capitol was targeted, besieged, and ransacked on Jan. 6 by a murderous mob holding a noose for Vice President Pence and targeting Speaker Pelosi. Their rampage resulted in offices and equipment destroyed, windows smashed and five people dead.

“We were attacked by terrorists. But this time, the terrorists were radicalized right here in the United States. Worse, they were radicalized by the president, who intentionally lied to his supporters that the election was stolen, and then told them when to come to D.C., where to protest, and who to direct their anger at. The need to remove this president could not be more urgent. He is too dangerous to remain in office.

“Donald Trump must be held accountable. He must be impeached.”

Statement by Rep. Doris Matsui

“As elected officials of our great nation, we are all entrusted with power derived directly from the American people. The foundation of American life begins and ends with the rule of law, and those who take an oath to uphold the Constitution have a sacred duty to protect that very right.

“The facts are crystal clear. The president incited last Wednesday’s insurrection against our nation’s most sacred democratic values – and his attempt to overthrow the will of the American people is a gross betrayal of his oath. This absolute disregard for our shared democratic tradition truly underscores the gravity of this moment in history and necessitated the urgent, decisive action of Congress to hold him accountable.

“It is not with joy that I have voted to impeach the president for a second time. I am taking a stand to ensure the future for our children and grandchildren. When we are asked by future generations what we did, we must be able to tell them that we fulfilled our obligation to keep our democracy strong.

“The president remains a clear and present danger to our nation as long as he is able to hold elected office, and that is why we acted to impeach him immediately.”

Statement by Rep. Mark Takano

“Today, I voted to impeach President Donald Trump for inciting a violent and deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. I took this solemn action in accordance with the oath I swore to support and defend our Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic.

“President Trump has shown himself to be a clear and present danger to our republic, our Constitution, and the rule of law. By inciting a violent insurrection and failing to use his influence to put a stop to his supporters’ seditious efforts, he has violated his oath to the Constitution. Congress has a responsibility to hold him accountable for his unlawful actions and for his repeated attempts to subvert the will of the people and impede the peaceful transition of power.

“I urge the Senate to take immediate action, begin a trial, and vote to convict President Trump. He should not hold the most powerful office in the world for one more minute, and he should be barred from public office forever. He is toxic to our democracy, and only we, the Congress, can prevent him from doing future damage. It would be irresponsible for those of us who can do something to do nothing.”

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